Content Reuse Opportunities at Rogers.ca

CONTENT REUSE OPPORTUNITIES AT ROGERS.CA

Overview:

Purpose and Goals:

The residential, small business, and wireless product divisions share many common calling features. However, the descriptions of these features have been handled by separate writers and are inconsistent in language, style, and format. By reusing content, Rogers can reduce costs by streamlining information across our product divisions. As well, we can ensure content accuracy by writing general or division-specific information according to standard guidelines. The goals of this report are to:
•   Define the content components required for each product division and provide guidelines for format.
•   Create a strategy for content reuse that implements content reuse for residential, small business, and wireless product divisions.
•   Identify which components must be tailored to individual product divisions.

Reuse Strategy:

•   Descriptions of calling features that are present in multiple product divisions can be reused. The description must exclude division-specific language. Calling features that are unique to a single division (e.g. Line hunting,” “enhanced voicemail) should also exclude division-specific language, in case features are rolled out to other product divisions in the future.
•   Currently, only the wireless division lists key features. If necessary, key features should be also written specific to residential and small business, highlighting any differences from the standard description.
•   Currently, only the wireless division lists costs of calling features. Calling features are value-added services in all product divisions. Therefore, “cost” should be available as an optional content component for all calling features and be specific to each product division.”
•   Users that want to add features to residential, small business and wireless services can contact customer service by phone, mail, or through the rogers.ca website. A single module should identify “How to add features,” and provide general contact information. Adding this module to a calling feature is optional. Division-specific “contact us” info should be retained in a separate section of the site.

Required Components for Each Calling Feature:

Description:

This is a brief summary of approximately one to three sentences that describes the function of the calling feature, and why it is useful. This should be written in the present tense, and be as concise as possible. Name of feature should be formatted in boldface.

Example: Call Return Busy/Last- Automatically redials the number of the last incoming call. If that number is busy, you’ll be alerted with a special ring when the line becomes available.

Key Features:

Key features should be formatted as three to five bullet points, written in the present tense. Each bullet point should describe key components of the calling feature. Key features follow logically from the description, and should not repeat information already presented.

Example:
•   Take up to 10 three-minute messages.
•   Save each message for up to five days.
•   Password-protect your messages.
•   Record a personalized greeting.
•   Access your messages on your wireless device, landline phone or online.

Cost:

This describes the standard or optional charges for the calling feature. All content should be formatted in boldface.

Example:
Enhanced Voicemail | $8.00/month

How to add features:

This provides the customer service phone number, link to live help, mailing address, or email address to add a calling feature.

Example:
To add this feature, go to http://www.rogers.ca/ web/content/contactus/, call 1-888-ROGERS1, or send mail to: 333 Bloor Street East, 7th Floor Toronto, ON M4W 1G9.
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About paulkhillier

I am technical writer with a wealth of experience in education and design. Currently, I am furthering my advanced knowledge by studying Technical Communication at Seneca College in Toronto. Producing effective, readable documents is my passion, and I take pride in producing quality work.

Posted on October 19, 2011, in Technical Communication. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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